2010 Midterm Elections

The Media on Blacks and the 2010 Midterm Elections

Young, Black and Digital

Edward James, Black Politics on the Web | October 25, 2010

The 2008 Presidential campaign was very special for me. In my very first time voting I had the opportunity to cast my ballot for the first Black presidential nominee of a major political party. Like many young and enthusiastic Americans who were eager to change the social, political, and economic landscape of this country I spent countless hours canvassing. However, I never rang any door bells. All my canvassing took place via my Facebook page. I created online fan pages and groups dedicated to social issues affecting teens of color. More than half of my friends who were active on Facebook during this time dedicated their profile pictures and statuses to endorsing a candidate. The opinions and conversations about the campaign that took place on social networking sites and blogs seemed to be a major influence on my peers. Although I still read local and national newspapers everyday, I probably spend just as much time reading political and socially conscious blogs. Citizen journalism has allowed many of my peers the opportunity to create their own bully pulpit. These platforms have been monumental in giving young people the opportunity to express themselves and influence their friends.  (Read the full article)

Blacks, Latinos agree racism a ‘major problem,’ whites say no

Stefano Esposito, Chicago Sun-Times | October 23, 2010

Nearly two years after the nation elected its first black president, Americans remain deeply divided on how big of a problem racism is, a new survey finds, with most blacks and Latinos saying it’s a “major problem” and most whites saying it’s not. Sixty-nine percent of African Americans and 51 percent of Latinos said they consider racism a “major problem,” according to the findings of the University of Chicago study released last week. That compares with 29 percent of whites and 32 percent of Asian Americans. That “polarization” suggests that President Obama needs to do more to bridge that gap, said Cathy J. Cohen, a U. of C. political science professor who was one of the survey’s lead investigators.  (Read more)

Study skewers black youth stereotypes

UPI | October 20, 2010

CHICAGO, Oct. 20 (UPI) — The younger generation of African-Americans is serious about politics and somewhat skeptical of rap music, results of a study released Tuesday reveal. The report issued by the University of Chicago was based on surveys and interviews and concluded black youth are by no means apathetic, can be socially conservative, and are turned off by negative messages contained in rap lyrics and videos. Professor Cathy Cohen, the lead researcher of the study and author of a book based on its results, “Democracy Remixed, Black Youth and the Future of American Politics,” said the research should clear up various “half truths” about the African-American community and its role in American politics.  (Read more)

New Study Shows Obama Effect is Waning

Emily Wilensky, WBEZ Chicago | October 20, 2010

The “Obama Effect” is waning, according to researchers at the University of Chicago. Among the minorities and young people surveyed, optimism toward politics spiked following the presidential election. It’s gone down since. Cathy Cohen is a political scientist who worked on the study. She says it’s going to take more than just one politician to get voters energized this election season. COHEN: And as mobilizing entities go out, they need to understand that the peak we saw just after the election is no longer there and they need to adjust their message appropriately.  (Read more)

Black youth are politically involved, shows study

Newstrack India | October 20, 2010

Washington, Oct 20 (ANI): A new study by University of Chicago has shown that conception about black youth that they are politically detached and negatively influenced by rap music and videos are completely false. Black youth say they are politically involved, critical of many messages in rap and skeptical of the idea that the country has entered a post-racial era. They also are socially conservative on issuess such same-sex marriage, said Prof. Cathy Cohen, the David and Mary Winton Green Professor of Political Science and lead researcher of the study. Using survey questions and focus group discussions, the study provides new insights into a youth culture often criticized and frequently misunderstood.  (Read more)

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Study shows black youth are politically involved, disputes other stereotypes

Science News | October 19, 2010

Many of the assumptions people have about black youth? That they are politically detached and negatively influenced by rap music and videos?are false stereotypes, according to a new University of Chicago study by Prof. Cathy Cohen, based on surveys and conversations with the youth themselves. Black youth say they are politically involved, critical of many messages in rap and skeptical of the idea that the country has entered a post-racial era. They also are socially conservative on political issues such same-sex marriage, said Cohen, the David and Mary Winton Green Professor of Political Science and lead researcher of the study. Using survey questions and focus group discussions, the study provides new insights into a youth culture often criticized and frequently misunderstood. The study comes as attitudes among black youth are being examined in light of the election of President Barack Obama, which brought hope as well as disappointment for people who expected more change, she said.  (Read more)

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Blacks Not Voting — A Scary Proposition

Steven Ivory, EURWeb| October 19, 2010

*During the Presidential election of 2008, I couldn’t talk to my black friends without the conversation coming around to Barack Obama. We all wanted to express both our excitement at the sheer concept of a black president, and our fears that it might not happen. We discussed everything from Obama’s campaign platform to his basketball skills. And we talked about voting. Whether we’d voted occasionally or never, we all knew we had to vote this time. There was too much at stake. I remember having invigorating political conversations with strangers everywhere I went.  I offered to drive a young man I’d just met  in a supermarket parking lot to the nearest post office so that he could register to vote. He didn’t take me up on  it (smart of him, my being a stranger and all), but told me it was the first time he’d ever discussed politics with anyone in his life.  In 2008, everyone I knew shared a certain exuberance about the situation. It was infectious.  (Read more)

Minority Voters Say Race Is Still a Big Issue

SAamer Madhani, NationalJournal.com | October 19, 2010

A new national survey shows that minorities are no more optimistic about race, even with an African-American president. The report published this afternoon by the Mobilization, Change, and Political Civic Engagement Project at the University of Chicago finds that despite hopes that the election of the first black president would help lessen racial tensions, issues of race appear to still worry minorities. About 69 percent of black respondents said that racism continues to be a major problem. That compares with 29 percent of whites, 32 percent of Asians, and 51 percent of Latinos who agreed with the statement. Across race, young people were less likely to say that racism is a major problem, according to the poll. The greatest disparity is among African-Americans, with 74 percent of older black respondents saying that racism is a major problem, compared with 60 percent of 18-to-35-year-olds. The find likely reflects older minorities’ experience of legal segregation.  (Read more)

Do Appearances on BET & MTV really engage young people in the Election process?

Politics from the eyes of an ebony mom

This afternoon had the opportunity to sit in on a conference call sponsored by the Mobilization, Change and Political and Civic Engagement Project (MCPCE). They took the opportunity to reveal their findings from a national survey which examined the changing attitudes of blacks, whites, Asians and Latinos regarding race, politics, immigration and more. The chief researcher Dr. Cathy Cohen served as the moderator. If you are interested in reviewing the research you can do so at www.2008andbeyond.com. (Read more)
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